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How to become a Lawyer

Advise and guide clients through the complex legal system

What do Lawyers do?

 

Lawyers inform clients about their legal rights and obligations. Steering individuals, businesses, and government agencies through legal issues and disputes, representing  them in courts and legal communications.

If you’re passionate about the law and using your knowledge to help others, and are competitive and committed to working tirelessly for the benefit of your clients from all walks of life, this career could be an option to research further.

 

About you:

  • Highly intelligent with an analytical mind
  • Exceptional written and verbal communication skills
  • Strong advocacy and problem-solving skills, adaptable to any case

 

The job:

  • Meet with and counsel clients
  • Perform legal research and prepare legal documents
  • Represent clients in criminal and civil court proceedings

Lawyer salary (average) $102,965 per year

(Source: au.indeed.com)

Job growth in law is strong (source: Joboutlook.gov.au)

Law is a very competitive field; to stand out ahead of other applicants you could work on keeping your grades high, and boost your resume with relevant work experience and voluntary work.

 

How to become a Lawyer in Australia

 

It can take as little as 4 years from leaving Year 12 to becoming a fully qualified, practising lawyer.

Step 1 – Do well in English and Maths at high school, consider studying history and psychology

Step 2 – Look at degrees you’d be interested in, check any pre-requisites required, e.g. Sitting the LAT (Law Admission Test)

Step 3 – Complete your university qualifications in Law (e.g. 3 year Bachelor of Laws at Bond, or a 5-7 year double degree Bachelor of Laws (LLB) at UNSW)

Step 4 – Undertake Practical Legal Training (PLT) to develop the practical skills and knowledge you’ll need by:

  • completing a Graduate Diploma of Legal Practice (GDLP) in 6-12 months, or
  • undertaking supervised workplace training for at least 12 months (only in QLD & VIC), or
  • do a minimum 12 months in a clerkship position (only if you are already working in the legal profession).

Step 5 – Apply for a certificate of practice to work as a legal practitioner in your state or territory:

Australian Capital Territory: Legal Practitioners Admission Board

New South Wales: Legal Profession Admission Board

Northern Territory: The Legal Practitioners’ Admission Board

Queensland: Legal Practitioners Admissions Board

South Australia: South Australian Board of Examiners

Tasmania: Legal Profession Board of Tasmania

Victoria: Victorian Legal Admissions Board

Western Australia: Legal Practice Board of Western Australia

 

Find out more here –

https://austbar.asn.au/

 

Similar Careers to Lawyer

 

Solicitor

Barrister

Judge

Magistrate

Prosecutor

Paralegal

Notary

Legal Executive

Legal Secretary

Conveyancer

Bailiff

Coroner

Court Clerk

 

Find out more about alternative careers.

 

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ’s)

 

  • How long does it take to become a lawyer? 

It takes a minimum of 4 years to qualify as a lawyer, but it can be longer depending on your pathway.

  • What do lawyers do?

Lawyers give advice, write legal reports and documentation, and conduct negotiations on legal matters. They represent clients in court and tribunal proceedings.

  • What’s the difference between a lawyer, solicitor and barrister?

Lawyer is a general term. Solicitors and barristers are called accordingly depending on the work they do (e.g. barristers might take on court cases only) and in which state or territory they’re practising in.

  • Where do lawyers work?

Typically based in an office environment, lawyers may also work in courts and conduct their business meetings in homes, hospital, prisons, and business settings.

  • Do I need to go to university to become a lawyer?

Yes, you’ll need to complete a relevant degree, get the practical work experience and register to practice with the relevant body before you can start working.

  • What other jobs can I do with a law degree?

Non-legal career options for law graduates and established lawyers include: accounting, journalism, politics, recruitment, politics, management consulting, Judge’s associate, human resources, investment banking, police prosecutor, and advocacy.

 




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